Java 8

On 18 march 2014, Oracle launched Java 8. I’ve had a little time to play with it. Here are my first experiences.


Eclipse 4.4 (Luna) will get support for Java 8. However, Eclipse 4.3.2 (Kepler) can support Java 8 by installing a feature patch. This page shows how to install the patch.

Once installed, you’ll need to tell your projects to use java 8. First add the JDK to eclipse:

  • Go to Window -> Preferences
  • Go to Java -> Installed JREs
  • Add Standard VM, and point to the location of the JRE
  • Then go to Compiler
  • Set Compiler compliance level to 1.8

Then tell the project to use JDK 1.8:

  • Go to Project -> preferences
  • Go to Java Compiler
  • ¬†Enable project specific settings
  • ¬†Set Compiler compliance level to 1.8

Now you should be able to develop your applications using Java 8.


To enable Java 8 in Maven, two things need to be done:

  1. Maven must use JDK 1.8
  2. Your project must be Java 8 compliant.

To tell maven to use JDK 1.8, point the JAVA_HOME variable to the correct location.
For the second point, make the project Java 8 compliant, add the following snippet to you pom.xml file:


Feature: streams

Streams can be used to iterate over collections, possibly in a parallel way. This has the advantage of making use of the multi-core architecture in modern computers. But more importantly, it makes the code shorter and more readable.

Case in point, consider the following code, for getting the minimum and maximum number in an array:

   public void minMax(int[] array){
      int min = array[0], max = array[0];
      for (int i : array) {
         if (i < min) {
            min = i;
         } else {
            if (i > max)
               max = i;
      System.out.println("Max is :" + max);
      System.out.println("Min is :" + min);

Nothing too shocking. But with Java 8 this could be done shorter and easier:

   public void java8(int[] array){
      IntSummaryStatistics stats = 

      System.out.println("Max is :" + stats.getMax());
      System.out.println("Min is :" + stats.getMin());

This method converts the array to an IntStream, and then collects the statistics of all numbers in that stream into an IntSummaryStatistics object. When testing this with an array of 10.000.000 items, spanning the range of 1.000.000 numbers, the performance is more than 5 times better with the first method though. The first running in 12 ms, the second in 69 ms.

Feature: lambda expressions

The biggest new feature of Java 8 is Lambda Expressions. These are sort of inline methods, and are mostly used in combination with streams. To explain this, let’s take a look at the following pieces of code. This will get all the files ending in “.csv” from a directory.

First, using a FilenameFilter:

      File sourceDir = new File("D:\\Tools");
      List<String> filteredList = Arrays.asList(sourceDir.list(new FilenameFilter(){

         public boolean accept(File dir, String name)
            return name.toLowerCase().endsWith(".csv");

Now, using a Lambda:

      File sourceDir = new File("D:\\Tools");
      List<String> filteredList = Arrays.asList(sourceDir.list())
            .filter(s -> s.toLowerCase().endsWith(".csv"))

Notice line 4, with the filter command. This replaces the accept method in the FilenameFilter. What it effectively does is the following:

For each String in the stream:
 - assign the String to s
 - Call s.toLowerCase().endsWith(".csv"), this will return a boolean
 - If the result is true, the String is passed to the next method in the stream
 - If the result is false, the next String is evaluated

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